Steps to Memorizing Chords: Half-Steps, Whole-Steps, and Thirds

PREMIUM CONTENT (member's only course material)

Today's video lesson was created especially for my current series, "Piano Chords 108." In this lecture, students will learn how to visualize and play half-steps, whole-steps, minor thirds, and major thirds on the piano.

What's in the video lesson below?

Intervals...

Half-steps and whole-steps are the two intervals that we use here to define minor and major thirds (which are also intervals).  It's the all-important thirds that we are especially focused on here, and we will construct them easily today, using just half-steps and whole-steps.

...Leading to Chords

In our chord speed-learning class called Piano Chords 108, you will achieve impressive memorization skills for chords by using the music theory concept of "stacking thirds."

As prerequisite knowledge for that class, this lecture is basically the stuff you gotta know.

After this Lesson:

Before moving on from this lesson, please be sure you can play (or visualize) both a minor and a major third on piano, starting on any given note, without stopping to think.  Even in the middle of a car chase, or a toddler's birthday party at that pizza-and-games place, this should be something you can do without thinking.

Assuming maybe you're not there yet, no worries! Today can be the day. It probably won't take more than one solid practice session after this video, for you to OWN what's covered in the lesson!

VIDEO LESSON BELOW:

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Announcing “Piano Chords 108: Lose That Chord Catalog”

I'm excited to announce a new online lesson series, in progress here at Piano With Kent, called Piano Chords 108.

Since my site is blog-like, this course will be published in installments. (That's also how we did things this summer with "The Blues Piano Crash Course" and "A Study in Blues Piano.")

Piano Chords 108 (the series introduction  is further below)

Here's the first few lessons I've posted for Piano Chords 108.  As with all full courses on this site, most of this material is premium content (accessible only to supporting members).

Half-Step, Whole-Steps, and Thirds on the Piano

Learn all 12 Major and Major Seventh Chords Together (24 chords)

Learn all 12 Minor and Minor Seventh Chords Together (24 more chords)

 

COURSE INTRODUCTION: 

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How to Riff on Van Morrison’s “Moondance” – Part 2

Hello!

This is Lesson Two of a three-part video series on "jazzy-rock" improvisation.

(Lesson One is here.)

(Lesson Three is here.)

///

These three tutorials would fit somewhere near the center of the jazzy-rock genre spectrum, if there was one.

I guess there could possibly be a jazzy-rock genre officially defined somewhere, like in a big canvas binder at the Genres Office, or like that. Regardless of the possibility of this being regulated, I'm using the term freely here, maybe even whimsically, maybe even having some devil-may-care attitude going.

If I had a managing editor you would not have seen the previous paragraph. Don't worry, with your continued support, we will hire a managing editor.

Van Morrison's Moondance is the "jamming vehicle" we're using in this trio of lessons. Moondance is a catchy tune, and it serves really well as a straightforward case study in jazzish-rockish piano improvisation.

 

VIDEO LESSON:

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Blues Piano Crash Course #11: How to play blues in any key (transpose)

from The Blues Piano Crash Course

This sample lesson (complete) is available to our visitors, and, of course, to our supporting members!

Lesson #11  (video)

Learn how to transpose the chords, scales, and concepts you learned in this crash course into other keys.

"All the same things" apply to playing blues in any key.  You will simply be learning the steps needed to move your musical patterns and shapes -- that is, the three main chords, the blues scale, your favorite licks, etc. -- into any desired key!

Especially good keys for you to learn to jam in are:

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Blues Piano Crash Course #9: The Melody Machine

from The Blues Piano Crash Course

Lesson #9  (video) "The Melody Machine"

This thing I like to call the  "melody machine" is by no means a new technique for creating strong melodies. Singers, composers and improvisers have built melodies this way forever.  In a nutshell, it's a specific way of using the underlying chord progression as a "generator" of melodic material.

Sometimes this "melody generating" concept doesn't get enough of a spotlight. By spotlight, I mean pointing it out and teaching it, in places where students can fully appreciate the power of the results.

So here's a great place for that spotlight:  the art and science of creating powerful blues licks!

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Blues Piano Crash Course #8: Blue notes & pitch-bending

from The Blues Piano Crash Course

Lesson #8  (video)

In this lesson, we master a couple of specific blues piano tricks of the trade.  I'm using the word specific here, because we're going to use these devices with a goal in mind, a musical effect that is pretty specific.

The "tricks" in this video are focused on emulating those sounds of blues singers and other instruments who can "bend" their notes (slide or play between pitches).  You'll learn about "blue notes," and also pick up a blues-boogie playing technique called the slide-off.

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