Notes to Für Elise – Entire Piece (video & sheet music with letter note-names)

Fur Elise letter-notes sheet music from pianowithkent.com

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“Moonlight” Sonata sheet music with letter-note names

Moonlight Sonata with Letter-names added - pianowithkent.com

PREMIUM CONTENT BELOW (for supporting members)

Hey there ya’ll!

I sincerely hope you and your piano are getting along well. You two were made for each other!  Relationships take work, never forget that.

This is another post for keyboard players who read music “a little bit,” but who may have trouble remembering all that stuff about key signatures, or sometimes forget which piano key belongs to which line or space on the staff.  This is quite common, so don’t feel bad!

Here at Piano With Kent, we have the expertise to accurately mark up sheet music, such that every note on the staff is labeled with its “LETTER-NAME,”  for example, Eb, F#, C.  (See image above.)  To do this accurately, one must always honor the prevailing key signature, as well as any accidentals.

Having each note labeled this way makes the music much easier to read!

Today’s selection is Beethoven’s famous “Moonlight Sonata,” entire first movement.

Moonlight Sonata with Letter-notes Included

 

 

Soloing Tips: Using the Pitch-Bend Wheel on Electronic Keyboards (part one)

Hey!

This lesson is for keyboard players who want to “properly” use the pitch-bend wheel on their electronic synths or other keyboard.  By “properly” I mean that you can’t just randomly roll that pitch wheel around and expect your keyboard licks to make any sense (outside of cartoonish sound effects).

If you want the professional sound of a killer solo when using a pitch-bend wheel, it’s a great idea to emulate the kind of pitch-bends that are used by experienced lead guitarists, sax players, and the like.  That’s the secret, and there’s some detailed explanation of certain ways to do that included in the video below.

Continue reading “Soloing Tips: Using the Pitch-Bend Wheel on Electronic Keyboards (part one)”

Blues Piano Licks #1 and #2 from “A Study in Blues Piano — Focusing on 12 Licks”

Hello there, students of blues, jazz and rock!

Blues Piano Lick #1 is available to all visitors:

Blues Piano Lick #2 is available to supporting members (Premium "All Access" members).  If you see the content below, then you are a logged in member. Thank you for your support!

The remaining content of this post is for supporting members. Your monthly membership is extremely affordable, and makes it possible for us to work full-time on the task of creating  FREE educational content, plus additional premium content, for members like you. This is a fast-growing site, and we really need your support as an "All Access" premium member   to keep this site alive.  (After signing up, you may need to refresh this page to open all the content.)

“The Blues Piano Crash Course”

Course Description

Learn the essential elements of blues piano, including the Blues Scale, the 12-bar Blues pattern, left-hand grooves, coordination exercises, and raw material for licks.

My goal is for you to start improvising great blues solos!

Although most of this course is in the key of C, there is a detailed lesson that covers transposing the blues scale, and the 12-bar blues progression, into other keys.

You will need no ability to read music. It will be very good, however, to have basic-to-intermediate level piano playing experience.

Attention supporting members 

We’re in the process of uploading all 11 lessons for this course, plus all supplemental lessons and documents.  These will be accessible 24×7 to all supporting members, right here.  

*The following lessons for are available now.  This list is growing, until all uploads are completed.

To receive updates of all new posts (including these lessons), you can provide your email address here (we never share your address with anyone, period!)

Lesson One – “The Blues Scale”

Supplemental (optional) from “A Study in Blues Piano” – Licks #1 and #2

Lesson Two – “A Left-hand Groove”

Lesson Three – “Five Must-know Riffing Devices”

Lesson Four – “The Classic 12-bar Blues Progression”

(#4 above is presently available to both non-members and visitors.)

Lesson Five – “Put Your Hands Together”

Lesson Six – More tips and practice on being a two-handed jammer

The rest are on their way! 

 

“A Study in Blues Piano – Focusing on 12 Licks” from Piano With Kent

Blues piano lessons from Kent Smith 

 

UPDATE from Kent, Sep. 13, 2018, 7:58 pm PST:

“A Study in Blues Piano” is presently being uploaded to our site here, as I write this. 

All twelve video lessons (they’re taught by me) AND also all eleven video lessons for “Blues Piano Crash Course” (also taught by me)  will be live and accessible 24×7, for streaming directly from this and other pages on this site.

You’re gonna love these courses, I guarantee it!

Here’s what we have so far (below).  FYI, a complete course description, lesson descriptions, and all that, are also coming on line soon.

Lick #1 of 12

Lick #2 of 12

Check back soon!

 

 

Do you need to read music to learn jazz or blues piano?

Wassup! Today I’m sharing my reply to a question from a student at Udemy.

STUDENT QUESTION:

Hi, Kent!

This is a two part question; first off, is there anything you recommend (videos, specific techniques, etc) to improve my sight-reading that won’t make me want to shout profanities?

I’ve Googled it obviously, but I’m curious about your opinion, as I enjoy your method of teaching.

Secondly, do you find skilled sight-reading necessary for jazz and blues? In other words, in your professional opinion, can I learn to be a proficient jazz and blues pianist without tackling my fear/hatred of sight-reading?

Continue reading “Do you need to read music to learn jazz or blues piano?”