Blues Piano Crash Course #11: How to play blues piano in any key (how to transpose)

PREMIUM CONTENT FOR SUPPORTING MEMBERS

 

Welcome to the very last lesson of my The Blues Piano Crash Course!

 


Lesson #11


How to Play Blues Piano in Any Key

Learn how to transpose the chords, scales, and concepts you learned in this crash course into other keys.

"All the same things" apply to playing blues in any key.  You will simply be learning the steps needed to move your musical patterns and shapes -- that is, the three main chords, the blues scale, your favorite licks, etc. -- into any desired key!

Especially good keys for you to learn to jam in are:

C, E*, A, G, B-flat, and F.

*Q: What new key to play in first?

A: For most contemporary keyboard players, I recommend that you first apply the concepts from this lesson (#11) to playing Blues in E.  My main reason for suggesting "E Blues" as your next key to conquer is that most guitar players really like to jam in E.  In standard guitar tuning, the key of E has lots of convenient hand positions, including especially comfortable fingerings for the E blues scale.  I'm sure there are other reasons for the popularity of E in guitar blues, but I think this is a big one. (I'm going by my own limited guitar-playing experience, with that "E is easier theory.")  But regardless of the reasons, there is absolutely no doubt that E is popular with guitarists and rock/blues bands, so if you're planning on jamming with guitarists, that's the first new key for you to learn. (Tip: You can pick "E" up right after, or right along with, your current studies in C -- I'm thinking "bilingual" studies here in a sense.).

VIDEO LESSON


Sorry!

The content you're trying to access is provided to supporting members only.


 

The 7#9 Chord: Possibly the Funkiest Chord Ever

Spread the love

To all you funked-up rocking hip-hopping bluesy jazzy people out there,

Today’s post features an outrageously funky, bluesy chord which is also used in rock, jazz, and many other places.

This blues-based powerhouse is often called the “Purple Haze” chord, made famous by a Jimi Hendrix song of the same name.  You may also hear it called, more generically, a “Hendrix chord.” (Hendrix did in fact use 7#9 chords in several of his major songs.)

First a SLIDE SHOW, then a VIDEO. Enjoy!

Continue reading “The 7#9 Chord: Possibly the Funkiest Chord Ever”

Beethoven Moonlight Sonata Notes – Letter-Name Sheet Music

Spread the love

Dear Beethoven  Fans,

Here’s a brand new sheet music selection for you.

Beethoven’s famous Moonlight Sonata, 1st movement, with letter notes.

 

LETTERED NOTES

Each note in this sheet music is labeled with its associated letter-name, such as E, D#, Ab.

Some markings (dynamics, etc.) have been omitted, so as to leave extra room for the added letters.

AUDIENCE

My letter-note labeled sheet music is primarily for adults who are not taking piano lessons–especially those who’ve had past experience reading music, but who might have forgotten many of the details.

THE SHEET MUSIC

Below is a list of currently available selections with lettered notes. This list is growing fast, so you might bookmark this page, and check back often.

Covid-19 Update: Regarding Private Lessons with Kent

Spread the love

(714) 485-8081

Private lessons with me (piano, keyboards, drums, and general music) are currently being conducted online only.  Skype, Zoom, Facetime.

To learn more about my qualifications, education, and performing experience, click here.


Slots are filling up, so please call now to schedule your free introductory lesson!

(714) 485-8081

 

Linus the Jazz Cat
Linus the Jazz Cat

 

Cheers!

Kent

(714) 485-8081

Blues Piano Crash Course #9: The Melody Machine

PREMIUM CONTENT (Lesson #3 is a free sample).

Lesson #9  (video) "The Melody Machine"

This thing I like to call the  "melody machine" is by no means a new technique for creating strong melodies. Singers, composers and improvisers have built melodies this way forever.  In a nutshell, it's a specific way of using the underlying chord progression as a "generator" of melodic material.

Sometimes this "melody generating" concept doesn't get enough of a spotlight. By spotlight, I mean pointing it out and teaching it, in places where students can fully appreciate the power of the results.

So here's a great place for that spotlight:  the art and science of creating powerful blues licks!


Sorry!

The content you're trying to access is provided to supporting members only.