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How To Memorize Music: The Rule of ‘Three Times Right’ for Memorizing Any Task

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Piano with Kent Hero Image How to Memorize Music
Learn the rule of THREE TIMES RIGHT and be a GREAT MEMORIZER!

How to memorize music with certainty?

Today, I want to share a very simple technique for being confident that you have memorized a section of music. This works for many similar things, such as an actor memorizing lines.

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Blues Lick #7: The ‘Flat-Three to Five’

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Blues Lick #7: Flat-Three to Five Patterns – From ‘A Study in Blues Piano

UPDATED by Kent: Mar. 30, 2021. A video blues tutorial describing a versatile lick pattern for jazz and blues piano.


Hello!

This short jazzy series of chromatic notes, which I call the Flat-3 to 5, is a familiar expression in the Blues. This easy type of lick (you can alter the lick very easily) is heard in a trillion mainstream jazz and blues melodies, as well as in all related music, anything that has even a touch of Blues Inflection.

Which means, you could call this a cliché. 

In the Blues, an improvising (lead) player might belt out a cliché, or ten, to explicitly let listeners know where they are:  “You are in the Blues, thank you very much!”  Any time you venture off into highly original blues territory, a cliché is a great place to come home to!

LESSON #7 – VIDEO TUTORIAL

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Für Elise Sheet Music with Letter-Labeled Notes | PDF Download

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Beethoven’s Für Elise Sheet Music with Letter-Note Names

Letter note-names on sheet music can be extremely helpful, sometimes almost indispensable, to people who have limited music-reading experience, and/or have no access to a teacher, and/or have limited mobility, or learning hindrances of any kind.

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Sheet Music: Lick #10 from “A Study in Blues Piano”

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More Sheet Music for ‘A Study in Blues Piano’

Updated Jan. 1, 2021.

Here’s a downloadable PDF file of sheet music covering Blues Piano Lick #10, for optional use with my course “A Study in Blues Piano” (all on this site).

This sheet is part of a supplemental collection I’m putting together, in response to recent requests.

Cheers!

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How to Play Difficult Chords on Piano or Keyboards

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How to Deal with ‘Over-Crowding’ of Your Fingers when dealing with Awkward Chords

Today’s post is taken from an online exchange between a YouTube follower of mine, and myself, regarding a question he had posted on one of my YouTube tutorials.  The topic of discussion here is playing certain difficult chord-shapes on piano

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Free Blues Piano Lessons: A Study in Blues Piano – Focusing on Twelve Licks

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Welcome to A Study in Blues Piano!

Course Description

This is an in-depth study of twelve blues licks, with extensive left-hand support tips. Each lick/riff is explored in detail, including variations, fingering, playing tips, and supporting music theory.

More than just learning the notes by rote, you will get insight into the patterns, scales, chords and intervals involved, including how to transpose each lick.

As a result, each lick will be mastered as RAW MATERIAL for endless variations, with applications in many musical settings (genres).

Lick #10 of this group is actually more than a lick; rather, it gives you a complete two-handed 12-bar opening groove, including a left-hand pattern to support your licks throughout your soloing.

Sheet Music

Students can download and print optional sheet music for several of the licks. There’s also a sample solo piece with a 12-bar introduction, followed by a 12-bar piano solo that features licks from the class.


  • THIS COURSE IS FREE TO VISITORS WHEN VIEWED HERE ONLY.  HOWEVER, ALL ORIGINAL CONTENT ON PIANOWITHKENT.COM REMAINS COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL, AUTHORIZED FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND IS NOT AUTHORIZED FOR DISTRIBUTION, UNLESS EXPLICITLY AUTHORIZED, IN WRITING, BY KENT D. SMITH OF PIANOWITHKENT.COM.
  • Piano With Kent is a US Registered Trademark.
  • Thank you for your continued support of free education!

By Kent. D. Smith of Piano with Kent. (c) 2010. (c) 2021.  All rights reserved.

 


THE TWELVE LICK STUDIES


One

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Learn all 12 Major & all 12 Maj7 Chords by Pattern (not by rote)

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<- Back to the Chords 108 Main Course Page

Welcome back!

Today we’ll learn the unique 3-letter formula the applies to every standard Major and Major Seventh Chord.

Audience: Any musician who’s struggling to memorize the individual notes to all those dang chords on piano or keyboards, and looking for a solution!

Description: Learn how to immediately call up the notes to any of the twelve major chords — without having to rely on rote memory.  This lesson applies to all twelve major seventh chords as well.

Video Lesson:

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Jazz Improv Lesson: A Nice Drill using “Approach Tones” | Free Jazz Tutorial Video

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Good Day!

Here’s a nice jazz drill, to give you practice on:

(1) Adding interest to your melody lines,  by sometimes preceding the “target tone(s)” of a chord with “approach tones;” and,

(2) increased mastery of any given scale, especially as it relates to the underlying chords.

As a result, the repeated act of mindfully (and not mindlessly) practicing this drill can increase your general facility with approach tones, as well as give you (possibly new) theoretical insights regarding chord-scale relationships.


VIDEO

 

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Jazz Soloing Tip #12

Jazz Half-Step Device for Jazz Solos
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Hello friends!

Try this: Go to your instrument and play a C-major scale from top to bottom (C B A G F E D C). Play these as evenly spaced eighth notes in 4/4 time.

You will notice that the final note, the lower C, does not land on a solid beat (in this case, that would be beat one). Instead, it lands on the last eighth note of the previous measure.

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