The Complete ‘Clair de Lune’ Sheet Music with Letters

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Claude Debussy’s timeless and extremely popular piano piece, Clair de Lune, is well-known around the world.  Its origins include influences from poetry, the music of Bach’s time (the Baroque period), and the artistic school of Impressionism.

The piece’s name means “moonlight.” It is the third movement of a four-part work called Suite Bergamasque.

 

Debussy’s music was a major departure from the Romantic music of the 19th century.  He, along with composer Maurice Ravel, is regarded as a primary founder of what came to be known as French Impressionism.


 

Blues Lick #6: “Locked up”

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Welcome Back to a Study in Blues Piano!


Blues Study Lick #6, “Locked Up”

This is a really exciting technique for what I like to call the “Big Blues” sound.  By “Big Blues,” I mean dramatic, exciting, full, like you might hear from a jazz big band.  This kind of lick also works great for building to a climax in your “blues story” (a good solo usually tells a story).
The name of this lick, “Locked Up,” ain’t necessarily because what you’re saying with your fingers might be a story about going to jail. In this video, “Locked up” actually refers to the core idea of the lesson, something called “locked rhythm.”

Continue reading “Blues Lick #6: “Locked up””

Chord Symbols: add2 or add9? (includes my video on using added ninth to chords)

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Hi Everyone!

I recently received a question today (on my YouTube channel), an excellent one, the topic of which is subject to debate.  The question is in response to one of my videos about using add9 chords on piano.  (A link to the video is included below.)

I thought I would share the thread here:

VIEWER: Isn’t the D in Cadd9 supposed to be an octave higher? I guess I’m just confused as to why it isn’t Add2 instead.

Continue reading “Chord Symbols: add2 or add9? (includes my video on using added ninth to chords)”

Chord Voicings for Jazz Piano (Rootless, Left-Hand, Type B)

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“Type B” Rootless Chord Voicings for Piano

“Rootless voicings” on piano (especially for left-hand support) are great for handling big jazz chords that normally can’t be covered by one hand alone. This video tutorial  shows you how to play a rich sounding II-V-I in the left hand, while allowing the bass player (or you, on another beat) to cover the root. Continue reading “Chord Voicings for Jazz Piano (Rootless, Left-Hand, Type B)”

Blues Piano Crash Course #8: Blue Notes & Pitch-Bending

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from The Blues Piano Crash Course

Lesson #8  (video)

In this lesson, we master a couple of specific blues piano tricks of the trade.  I’m using the word specific here, because we’re going to use these devices with a goal in mind, a musical effect that is pretty specific.

The “tricks” in this video are focused on emulating those sounds of blues singers and other instruments who can bend their notes (slide or play between pitches).  You’ll learn about “blue notes,” and also pick up a blues-boogie playing technique called the slide-off.

Continue reading “Blues Piano Crash Course #8: Blue Notes & Pitch-Bending”

How to improvise in modal jazz: “So What” by Miles Davis

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Attention!

The following post is not just for jazz players!


It seems to me that contemporary modal improv, which had its jazz  birth in the late 1950’s, was a huge influence on the increasingly improvisational rock of the 1960’s, (even when players might not have consciously realized it!), and has never stopped being at the heart of so many great pop/rock/jazz solos until this very day.

This is a brief introduction to the idea of “modal jazz.”  We’re going to look at probably the most famous example of modal jazz, a tune called “So What,” by Miles Davis and Bill Evans.

We’re looking at this piece because (1) it was part of a ground-breaking approach to jazz improvisation and composition when it came out, and it’s still definitive of the modal jazz genre (maybe the definitive  recording?) (2) because “So What” is the best-known track on one of top-selling jazz albums of all time, “Kind of Blue.”

Continue reading “How to improvise in modal jazz: “So What” by Miles Davis”

Chord Voicings for Jazz Piano (rootless, left-hand, Type A)

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“Type A” Rootless Chord Voicings for Piano

“Rootless voicings” on piano (especially for left-hand support) are great for handling big jazz chords that normally can’t be covered by one hand alone. This video tutorial  shows you how to play a rich sounding II-V-I in the left hand, while allowing the bass player (or you, on another beat) to cover the root.

Continue reading “Chord Voicings for Jazz Piano (rootless, left-hand, Type A)”